Benelli Brings 4-Cylinders Back To LAMS Market With TNT 600i



In recent years Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMS) bikes have by and large been limited to 1 or 2-cylinder engines, but Benelli is set to bring a screaming 4-cylinder option to the Kiwi marketplace later this year.


The 2022 Benelli TNT 600i is expected to arrive in the Australian and New Zealand markets in September with pricing yet to be set at the time of writing. However, local Benelli distributor Urban Moto Imports promises the TNT 600i will be priced competitively and backed by a full 2-year unlimited-kilometre warranty, and 2 years of premium roadside assist.



The engine puts down a healthy amount of power for the LAMS segment, with Benelli claiming a maximum engine power of 54 hp (44 kW) at 11,170 RPM, with maximum torque of 51 Nm coming in at 10,500 rpm. The engine is backed by a six speed gearbox with a chain final drive.


While wet weight hasn't been released for the 2022 model, it still utilises a steel trellis frame the previous generation of the TNT 600i tipped the scales at 220kg so don't expect the new bike to be under 200kg.


Pulling everything to a stop is a set of 320 mm diameter semi-floating discs at the front with radial 4-piston calipers, while out the back the rear system features a 260 mm diameter disc. Braking is, of course, backed by ABS.



Rolling stock comes in the form of aluminium alloy 17-inch rims are fitted with 120/70 and 180/55 tyres. Keeping everything in contact with the ground properly is a set of beefy 50mm USD forks in front and an aluminium alloy swingarm at the rear with an adjustable monoshock with spring preload.


Tech-wise the 2022 TNT 600i features its fair share of desirable gadgets including a full-colour TFT dash, backlit switchgear and a full suite of LED lighting.



The last 4-cylinder LAMS bike we rode was the Yamaha XJ6N in roughly 2015, with that model discontinued in the NZ market shortly thereafter. The Benelli could give up and coming riders who want to experience the smoothness and high-pitch engine noise of an inline-four a rare opportunity in a world where most manufacturers are opting for fewer cylinders in all of their machines.